Quick instructions

The sections below review the basic steps for creating article submissions, blog posts, and features/fixes for Push itself.

If you’re new to Git, you might want to have a read through the full Learn area on the Push site. Additionally, there is more help to be found in the Git Community Book. For an excellent and thorough treatment of Git, purchase Travis Swicegood’s Pragmatic Version Control Using Git

Article Submission

  1. To prepare a submission for Push, run

     $ git checkout -b submission

    which creates and checks out a branch called submission. (Note: you can use other branch names, but make sure that whatever you choose would make sense to yourself, and others.)

  2. Then, change directories into submissions and make a copy of the _starter.md file, using the pattern lastname-submission-title.md. We’ll pretend for this example that Lesley Smith is preparing a submission called “HTML is the Best”:

     $ cd submissions
     $ cp _starter.md smith-html-is-the-best.md
  3. Now’s a good time to add that file and commit it to Git:

     $ git add smith-html-is-the-best.md
     $ git commit -m "Starting my submission, HTML is the Best"
  4. Open your file in your editor of choice, and start writing. As you reach what seem to be significant milestones in your writing, be sure to add and commit the file to Git as above.

  5. To make sure that your work is backed up off of your computer and available for you to clone onto other computers, be sure to periodically run:

     $ git push origin submission

    which will push your submission branch to a submission branch on your fork of Push.

  6. Once your submission is ready for review, submit a pull request by hitting the Pull Request button on GitHub on your fork of the Push repository. Make sure you choose the correct branch with your submission work from your repository when submitting your request.

Need more help? read through the Push Learn area and style guide for additional information and guidance. And if you need a question answered, just open an Issue on the Push repository.

Blog Submission

  1. To prepare a blog submission for Push, run

     $ git checkout -b blogpost

    which creates and checks out a branch called blogpost. (Note: you can use other branch names, but make sure that whatever you choose would make sense to yourself, and others.)

  2. Then, change directories into _posts and make a copy of the _starter.md file, using the pattern YYYY-MM-DD-post-title.md. We’ll pretend for this example that Lesley Smith is preparing a blog post called “New CSS3 Styles” on November 1, 2012:

     $ cd _posts
     $ cp _starter.md 2012-11-01-new-css3-styles.md
  3. Now’s a good time to add that file and commit it to Git:

     $ git add 2012-11-01-new-css3-styles.md
     $ git commit -m "Starting my blog post, New CSS3 Styles"
  4. Open your file in your editor of choice, and start writing. As you reach what seem to be significant milestones in your writing, be sure to add and commit the file to Git as above. For example, filling out the YAML front matter at the top of the file is a milestone worth commiting.

  5. To make sure that your work is backed up off of your computer and available for you to clone onto other computers, be sure to periodically run:

     $ git push origin blogpost

    which will push your blogpost branch to a blogpost branch on your fork of Push.

  6. Once your submission is ready for review, submit a pull request by hitting the Pull Request button on GitHub on your fork of the Push repository. Make sure you choose the correct branch with your submission work from your repository when submitting your request.

Need more help? read through the Push Learn area and style guide for additional information and guidance. And if you need a question answered, just open an Issue on the Push repository.

Features and Fixes

Features and fixes for Push should be kept on separate, topical branches. In this case, we’ll pretend someone is on a typo-fixing rampage. All of the fixes, in other words, are catching typos. No major content rewrites, or CSS style fixes, or anything like that (each of those would get their own feature branch).

  1. To prepare a topical branch for typos, run:

     $ git checkout -b typos

    which creates and checks out a branch called typos.

  2. Open the problem file or files in your editor of choice, and start fixing. As you reach what seem to be significant milestones in your work, be sure to add and commit the files to Git.

  3. To make sure that your work is backed up off of your computer and available for you to clone onto other computers, be sure to periodically run:

     $ git push origin typos

    which will push your typos branch to a typos branch on your fork of Push.

  4. Once your feature/fix is ready for review, submit a pull request by hitting the Pull Request button on GitHub on your fork of the Push repository. Make sure you choose the correct branch with your submission work from your repository when submitting your request.

Need more help? read through the Push Learn area for additional information and guidance. And if you need a question answered, just open an Issue on the Push repository.

Documentation Is Rarely Perfect

Spot something wrong with this documentation? Please open an Issue on GitHub and tell us about it, or if you can, fork, clone, fix, and open a pull request.